An artist's impression of the approved treetop home.
An artist's impression of the approved treetop home.

36 trees to get chopped to make way for luxury treetop cabin

Approved plans for a luxury treetop cabin will only be able to go ahead if 36 trees on the site are chopped down.

A development application to remove the trees on the site in Scott Street, Byron Bay, has been lodged with Byron Shire Council and is on public exhibition until March 2.

According to documents lodged with the council, “a number of trees have regrown onto the site” since approval was given for the cabin.

“Most of the trees proposed for removal are under 20 years in age, and are likely to have regenerated in the time since development consent was granted,” the report states.

“In all, to accommodate the building of a dwelling within the existing building envelope, 36 native trees require removal.

Some of the trees that will have to be chopped down to make way for a new treetop house in Byron Bay.
Some of the trees that will have to be chopped down to make way for a new treetop house in Byron Bay.

“Every effort has been made to retain as many trees as possible.

“This includes allowing for the retention of trees that are very close to the building envelope.

“This is possible because of the ‘treetop’ pillar building technique.”

However the size of the site and bushfire issues will make it “impracticable” to provide compensatory plantings consistent with the council’s policy.

“Despite this limitation, a landscaping plan with 12 native trees sourced from the site and another 12 native shrubs is provided,” the report states.

Consent for the construction of nine cabins was provided by Byron Shire Council in 1989.

In 2002, the cabin lots were subdivided onto individual titles.

The cabins form part of the Oasis site, which offers accommodation in luxury treetop houses and apartments.