ESTATE SALE: An amazing array of antiques, art, collectables and furniture will go under the hammer at a huge deceased estate sale at the end of June.
ESTATE SALE: An amazing array of antiques, art, collectables and furniture will go under the hammer at a huge deceased estate sale at the end of June. Supplied

Antiques, collectables to go under hammer at huge auction

A RARE piece of furniture from 1886 will be one of the hundreds of items to be auctioned off at a huge sale in Lismore this month.

There will also be paintings, glassware, fine china, furniture, clocks, chairs, rocking horses, silverware and even some Norman Lindsay prints.

Bidders are expected to swarm to snap up bargains at this deceased estate auction, which will be hosted by Ian Weir & Sons at the William Riley Pavilion at the Lismore Showgrounds on June 29.

Auctioneer Kevin Cocciola said it will be one of the largest and most interesting estate auctions he will have conducted - and he reckons it will take a good five hours to get through the many hundred of items up for grabs.

"We have an entire pavilion and another half pavilion packed with all sorts of antiques and collectibles," he said.

"Viewing starts at 7.30am onwards and we start the auction at 9am and hope to be done by 2pm."

Mr Cocciola said the sale was from the deceased estate of Raymond Coughlin, who formerly lived in South Lismore and passed away last month.

He said there were some fascinating art, antiques and collectables in the mix and he was astonished at what was in storage.

"It's hard to believe but everything in the sale was in two little rooms of a shop in Lismore and it was like a jungle in there," he said.

"We are expecting a good crowd as there has been a hell of a lot of enquiries.

"There everything from Lada porcelain, oriental china pieces and lots of furniture."

Mr Cicciola said people have been making enquiries from capital cities as well as from all over NSW and the region.

"You never know what's there," he said.

"There is a Louis XVI reproduction desk but it would make $400,000 if it was genuine, the piano looks good and in Sydney it would make $2500; here it might make $250.

"And I was amazed to see a piece of furniture from 1886.

"It's a little cane top stand, it's very rare and I'm sure will attract a lot of interest."