Dr Peter Alexakis is involved in a legal battle over a $30m will of a deceased patient. Picture: Sam Ruttyn
Dr Peter Alexakis is involved in a legal battle over a $30m will of a deceased patient. Picture: Sam Ruttyn

Battle for mystery tycoon’s $30m fortune

A doctor has been accused of "undue influence" and "fraud" after his Western Sydney property tycoon patient left him 90 per cent of his more than $30 million will, according to court documents.

Raymond John McClure, who never married and had no children, made six wills between 1986 and his death at 84 in November 2017.

Mr McClure's estate included $30 million in share holdings, $1 million held in the US, a historic Strathfield house and the mystery contents of a Swiss bank account.

According to documents filed at the Supreme Court the second, third and fourth wills in various forms left his house and the "residue" of his wealth to his 40-year business partner, Frank Camilleri, who maintained Mr McClure's investment properties, long time friend Hildegard Schwanke, and the Salvation Army.

In the last years of his life Mr McClure received treatment from Strathfield GP Dr Peter Alexakis.

Less than six months before he died, Mr McClure wrote two new wills that left the bulk of his estate to Dr Alexakis, according to court ­documents.

The house in Strathfield which is part of Raymond McClure’s estate. Picture: Julian Andrews
The house in Strathfield which is part of Raymond McClure’s estate. Picture: Julian Andrews

The first will, from June 2017, left Dr Alexakis 65 per cent of the estate, court documents said. Mr Camilleri was to receive 25 per cent and 10 per cent was left to Ms Schwanke.

A second will written one month later increased the share Dr Alexakis was to receive to 90 per cent of the estate including Mr McClure's house and other "specific gifts", like a multimillion-dollar Strathfield property, the documents said.

Mr Camilleri's share was reduced to nine per cent while Ms Schwanke was to receive one per cent.

The two 2017 wills have set off a complex web of court cases. Mr Camilleri, Ms Schwanke and the Salvation Army have launched legal action in the NSW Supreme Court challenging the validity of the two 2017 wills.

In court documents, they claim the 2017 wills "were executed in suspicious circumstances that indicate Dr Alexakis exercised undue influence over" Mr McClure.

Alternatively, they claimed Dr Alexakis "was in a relationship of … undue influence over" Mr McClure.

The court heard Dr Alexakis, whose wife owns an $8 million Vaucluse mansion, has denied the accusations and has asked the court to enforce the wills.

The Salvation Army claimed in court documents the wills were "executed in suspicious circumstances" and "vitiated by fraud".

Complicating matters, Mr Camilleri has launched a cross claim to be paid for alleged "decades of unpaid work" he did for Mr McClure.

The Salvation Army has also launched another cross claim asking the court to recognise a 2016 will that made no mention of Dr ­Alexakis.

The legal battle comes as the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency has placed several conditions on Mr Alexakis' operating licence, including banning him from conducting home or nursing home visits.

His medical practice was also to be audited within six months of November 28, 2017, and was banned from supplying or administering "drugs of addiction".

The Health Care Complaint Commission is also pursuing Dr Alexakis in NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal over an undisclosed disciplinary action.

When approached on Saturday, Dr Alexakis said there was a lot he could say but was unable to because of the court case.

Mr McClure made money on Western Sydney properties before converting his wealth into a greater fortune on the stock market.

The Medical Board of Australia's rules state a doctor must not encourage patients to give them gifts or benefits.

Originally published as Battle for mystery tycoon's $30m fortune

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