Cudgen Junior Rugby League's Noah Slockee making a dive. Photo: Peta Thierjung
Cudgen Junior Rugby League's Noah Slockee making a dive. Photo: Peta Thierjung

BATTLERS: Club forges ahead after fire, virus, border bubble

IT'S a tale of the Aussie battlers for Cudgen Junior Rugby League Club.

First, their dressing sheds and change rooms were destroyed when the Cudgen Leagues Club went up in flames in May.

Then, the coronavirus pandemic put a halt on community sport until July 1.

Now, they face being part of a competition running from Tugun to Byron Bay, crossing outside of the 'border bubble'.

However the Tweed rugby community has dusted themselves off and continued forward with a plan to raise money to replace essential club facilities for their 250 junior and 80 senior athletes.

 

Cudgen Junior Rugby League's Jesse Slockee with the ball. Photo: Peta Thierjung
Cudgen Junior Rugby League's Jesse Slockee with the ball. Photo: Peta Thierjung

 

Part of their efforts have seen the CJRLC receive a community kickback from Essential Energy and named as one of 50 local footy clubs to receive a $5000 grant from St George Bank.

Treasurer Joanne Weaver said as the Leagues Club building goes through the insurance process, the senior rugby club hired portables to use.

However these require extra volunteers for COVID-19 safety plans and a lack of volunteer numbers, the juniors are unable to use them.

 

Cudgen Junior Rugby League Club's temporary facilities after the main building burnt down earlier this year.
Cudgen Junior Rugby League Club's temporary facilities after the main building burnt down earlier this year.

 

"Every little bit helps, we are going on and getting whatever we can to build up (our facilities) and then hopefully get council approvals for more permanent structures," she said.

Ms Weaver has been involved with the club for about 12 years, half of which spent on the committee.

She said across the years it was easy to see the way the sport had connected the community from meeting neighbours to keeping fit and active.

"I personally love watching them grow from little four and five year olds to last year of juniors un the under 16s," Ms Weaver said.

"I was little heartbroken about the club because of the massive history it has in our area, but I knew the community would come together to help rebuild and get back bigger and better."