Jeffrey Nuske, 74 of Noosa, is suing Noosa Tenpin Bowling over a shoulder injury.
Jeffrey Nuske, 74 of Noosa, is suing Noosa Tenpin Bowling over a shoulder injury.

Bowler sues over tenpin slip-up

STICKY shoes stopped Noosa businessman Jeffrey Nuske in his tracks when he went tenpin bowling for the first time in his life, just days after his 73rd birthday.

Mr Nuske claims he was not offered bowling shoes and things went badly wrong when he went to take his second delivery of a bowling ball, wearing his own sports shoes.

He was injured when his rubber-soled shoes gripped, he stumbled forward, fell off a lane and used his arms to stop his head hitting a metal beam.

He is suing Noosa Tenpin Bowling operator Orjan Bowling Pty Ltd for $205,800 in a District Court personal injury damages claim.

Mr Nuske and his wife Aprile, had joined 15 other family members at Noosa Tenpin Bowling on June 24, 2017, partly to celebrate his recent birthday.

"I'd never bowled in my life and I didn't want to look like an idiot, so my wife and I first watched a YouTube video on how to bowl,'' Mr Nuske said.

"When I went to pay my fee I was never asked if I wanted to hire special shoes.''

Mr Nuske knocked over seven pins in his first bowl, but when he took the next three-step approach his foot jammed, as his shoes did not slide.

It caused Mr Nuske to step forward with his left foot past the foul line, he lost his balance, tripped over the edge of the bowling lane and fell 60cm into a service lane, the District Court claim says.

Jeffrey Nuske, 74 of Noosa, is suing Noosa Tenpin Bowling over a shoulder injury. Picture: Ben Voss
Jeffrey Nuske, 74 of Noosa, is suing Noosa Tenpin Bowling over a shoulder injury. Picture: Ben Voss

He badly injured his left shoulder, fracturing the humerus, when put his left arm up to protect himself from injury before hitting the beam, and later suffered carpal tunnel syndrome.

"The blade of the beam was facing towards me, I could see it coming so on reflex I put my arms up to protect myself. I smashed into the beam,'' Mr Nuske said.

Mr Nuske has had three operations and faces the possibility of more surgery, his claim says.

It alleges Noosa Tenpin Bowling only provided patrons with specialised bowling shoes, designed to prevent injury by allowing them to slide, when they requested them.

Mr Nuske was unaware of the risk that other footwear might grip and not slide and he could lose balance, stumble and be injured, the claim says.

The former engineer who operates two businesses, could not raise his arms or lift objects and for the first six months he had to sleep in a chair.

"My wife had to dress and shower me and drive me. Before this I was a strong, capable and independent person,'' Mr Nuske said.

Melissa Cheshire of Shine Lawyers said specialised bowling shoes were known to be a key piece of equipment for any tenpin bowler, to reduce the risk of injury.

"By not advising or warning a first-time bowler such as Jeffrey of the risks of wearing sports shoes on their lanes, the centre has failed in their duty of care to him,'' Ms Cheshire said.

Orjan Bowling declined to comment.