Neurosurgeon Peter Geoffrey Lucas
Neurosurgeon Peter Geoffrey Lucas

Child porn accused barred by hospital

A BRISBANE brain surgeon has been suspended from practising at Brisbane Private Hospital after being charged with one count of distributing child exploitation material.

Neurosurgeon Peter Geoffrey Lucas, 44, appeared before Brisbane Magistrates Court this week.

Brisbane Private Hospital general manager Claire Gauci said Dr Lucas had been suspended from practising at the hospital, pending an investigation.

"Given this is now a police matter, it is inappropriate to comment further," Ms Gauci said in a statement.

The Courier-Mail understands Dr Lucas rents consulting rooms at Brisbane Private Hospital, and operates out of there, but is not an employee of the hospital.

He remains registered by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency.

Dr Lucas graduated with a medical degree from the University of Queensland in 1998.

In 2007 he was awarded a fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in neurosurgery.

 

Peter Geoffrey Lucas leaves the Brisbane watchhouse. Picture: Ten News
Peter Geoffrey Lucas leaves the Brisbane watchhouse. Picture: Ten News

 

He completed his basic surgical training at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane and then specialised in neurosurgery, with stints in Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Christchurch and Melbourne.

Dr Lucas spent six months as a neurosurgical fellow at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, England, before returning to Queensland to take up a consultant's position at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital.

He no longer works at RBWH, setting up his private medical practice Neuron in 2009.

Dr Lucas has been granted bail and is due to reappear in court on September 30.

In a statement, the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency said: "Confidentiality provisions that apply to us under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law prevent us from commenting on individual practitioners or complaints about individual practitioners unless that information is publicly available on the national public register of practitioners."

The law in Queensland provides that the Office of the Health Ombudsman receives all complaints about health practitioners.

Comment has been sought from the office.