The back window of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese’s van was shot out, new photographs reveal. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police/AAP
The back window of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese’s van was shot out, new photographs reveal. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police/AAP

Chilling new details of Canada murders

Details filtered through slowly as Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky carried out their murder spree across Canada in July.

Now, three months on, reporters who were given privileged access to the police investigation have revealed what police knew but could not say publicly.

Nine News US Correspondent Alexis Daish was covering the story on the ground as the manhunt moved from the Alaska Highway in British Columbia across several provinces.

She reports that she was allowed inside the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's BC headquarters as the investigation was unfolding but not allowed to tweet or publish anything until now.

Among the information police shared were crime scene photographs of the vehicle driven by Sydney man Lucas Fowler and his American girlfriend Chynna Deese before they were murdered.

The photographs show the back window of their blue van had been shot out. The couple were both shot multiple times by either McLeod or Schmegelsky.

Police released this image of the couple’s van. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Police released this image of the couple’s van. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Reporters were also shown the murder weapons - two SKS type firearms purchased legally by McLeod as the teens set off from Port Alberni to carry out their murders.

The police file also includes a disturbing close call reported by a witness who did not tell police about his encounter with the young killers until four days after it happened," Nine News reports.

The incident took place after Mr Fowler and Ms Deese were murdered on the same stretch of Alaska Highway and involved a man who had pulled over for a nap.

"Within 5 minutes of being parked, a truck with camper drove past him and stopped about 50 yards ahead," the police report states.

"An unknown male got out of the passenger side of the truck holding a long gun. The male walked towards the tree line and started moving towards the witness in a tactical or hunting stance.

"The truck also started driving slowly towards the witness. The witness drove away from the armed male and drove past the truck. The driver covered his face with his hand and the witness was not able to see the driver's face."

The weapons used by the teens to kill three innocent people and then themselves. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
The weapons used by the teens to kill three innocent people and then themselves. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

McLeod and Schmegelsky would go on to murder University of British Columbia lecturer Leonard Dyck, steal his car and lead police on a manhunt across BC, Alberta, Saskachewan and Manitoba.

The pair recorded videos on Mr Dyck's digital camera, including one 58-second video in which Schmegelsky admits they "are responsible for the three murders" and they "were going to march to Hudson Bay" where they "planned to hijack a boat and go to Europe or Africa".

In another video, Schmegelsky describes how they had "shaved in preparation for their own death" and "plan to go back to kill more people and expect to be dead in a week".

McLeod shot Schmegelsky before turning the gun on himself.

They had travelled more than 3000km before their bodies were found in remote bushland.

Along the way they stopped to buy petrol, a cowboy hat, chocolate bars, a crow bar and electrical tape and to inquire in dry communities whether it was legal to buy and consume alcohol.

Schmegelsky's father Alan told reporters his son was "on a suicide mission".

"He wants his hurt to end," Mr Schmegelsky told Canadian Press.

"They're going to go out in a blaze of glory.

"Trust me on this."

 

Schmegelsky at a business in Chetwynd, British Columbia. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police/AAP
Schmegelsky at a business in Chetwynd, British Columbia. Picture: Royal Canadian Mounted Police/AAP

If you or someone you know is in need of crisis or suicide prevention support, please call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit www.lifeline.org.au/gethelp