Evans Head visitors have said they will boycott the town after their crab pots were stolen from the river.
Evans Head visitors have said they will boycott the town after their crab pots were stolen from the river.

Crab pot theft drives Evans Head tourists away

A FAMILY who travels to Evans Head each year will leave town with a sour taste in their mouths after their crab pots were stolen from the river.

Four of their crab pots were slashed, then repaired, and later stolen from the river on February 26.

Mellissa Smyth took to Facebook to warn others about the risk of leaving crab pots in the river.

A friend of Mellissa's later said the family had decided not to return to Evans Head.

"They save all year to have their holidays in Evans and spend around $4000 in the two weeks they are here," John Spackman said.

"They support all the local businesses and eat at the local restaurants.

"They have decided that they are not going to do that in Evans Head any more.

"They are going to travel elsewhere like Yamba or Iluka where they can pursue the same interests.

"Sounds like a lot for a few crab pots doesn't it.

"But these tourists only get one chance a year to participate, they don't live here, and they treasure those moments that they are here."

Those who replied to the post said it was a relatively common occurrence, particularly during the holiday season.

Ballina's Rick Foster said it's better to use crab dillies when catching crabs.

"To be honest leaving pots out and going home for the night is just asking for trouble, as not only do the dishonest get a free for all on your stuff, but a lot of people use the lighter-built traps and they can drift with the stronger tides," Mr Foster said.

"When they are lost they just keep killing crabs and fish that enter and cannot get out."

Ms Smyth reported the matter to police who have been investigating it.

Police said they have been undertaking regular patrols of the Evans Head River near the bridge.

Regarding this incident there have been no suspects identified, and anyone with information should contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.