Lismore man Christopher John Gibson, shed tears when he was found not guilty of the murder of his son, Shawn Gibson.
Lismore man Christopher John Gibson, shed tears when he was found not guilty of the murder of his son, Shawn Gibson. Marc Stapelberg

'TRAGEDY': Lismore dad found not guilty of murdering son

AFTER being in custody since November 2016, Lismore man Christopher John Gibson, shed tears when he was found not guilty of the murder of his son, Shawn Gibson.

As the jury foreman delivered the second verdict which found Mr Gibson was also not guilty of manslaughter, Mr Gibson, 63 trembled and quietly cried with relief.

Earlier while awaiting the jury's return to the courtroom, Mr Gibson sat up straight, pressed his back into the wooden seat and rested his palms on his knees, his face creased in apprehension.

His defence barrister Jason Watts and instructing solicitor James Fuggle both shook Mr Gibson's hand, as Judge S. Rothman said Mr Gibson was free to go.

Judge Rothman then congratulated the defence and prosecution teams for their work during the case.

Blinking in the sunshine as he left the courthouse in Zadoc St with Mr Fuggle, Mr Gibson who was formally dressed in a pinstripe shirt, dark trousers and polished black shoes, appeared composed as his solicitor made a statement on his behalf.

"Mr Gibson has indicated to me he is very grateful for the verdict, however, at the same time it's a tragedy that has happened, he has to live with this for the rest of his life," he said.

"He is obviously still bereft of the loss of his son and the effect this has had on the larger family, it's something which will have to be dealt with over many years and into the future."

Mr Fuggle then thanks the media and community for their interest and asked them to respect Mr Gibson's privacy.

Mr Gibson was accused of murdering his son, during a violent altercation on the evening of November 18, 2016, when he defended himself when his son "flew" at him in a rage in the living room of his North Lismore home.

The younger Gibson was stabbed twice, with one fatal wound on the right side of his neck severing a critical artery when it penetrated his upper chest lining to a depth of 6cm.

The jury which comprised four men and eight women, took two and a half hours to come to the decisions which saw Mr Gibson leave the supreme court in Lismore as a free man.