HIDING SPOT: An echidna found a hiding spot in a lounge in a home in the region.
HIDING SPOT: An echidna found a hiding spot in a lounge in a home in the region. Contributed

Echidnas aren't lounging about, bar one

ECHIDNAS are active earlier than usual this year.

In June alone, WIRES had 24 calls for echidnas needing assistance.

One echidna wandered into a local kitchen and wedged itself into a small space.

A WIRES volunteer could not move him or entice him to come out of his corner.

As the family was going out for the evening, it was decided to leave the door open.

Hopefully the echidna would leave the house whilst everything was quiet.

When they returned to the house, the echidna had indeed moved, but not outside.

He had relocated to a spot under a cushion on the lounge.

Eventually, a bit of clever thinking resolved the situation.

The lounge was carried outside and tipped upside down.

The echidna eventually let go and wandered off.

The short-beaked echidna and the platypus are the only two egg-laying mammals (monotremes) in the world.

The echidna's sharp spines, called quills, cover its back and moult every year.

Each individual spine has a muscle attached to its base, giving the animal control over the movement and direction of its spines and enabling it to anchor itself firmly onto many surfaces by using the erect spines.

The 24-hour hotline is for all calls to WIRES in the Northern Rivers is 6628 1898.