Five words Macca’s fans can’t cope with

"WHY not skip the straw?"

Those are the five words hungry customers are now being asked at McDonald's restaurants across Australia.

Signs have been spotted showing up at McDonald's restaurants around the country, informing customers that if they want a straw, they'll need to ask.

It's part of a trial to identify an appropriate solution to the brand's pledge to ban plastic straws by 2020, a McDonald's Australia spokesperson told news.com.au

But apparently, the five-word question is proving too much for some, with people slamming the new requirement being introduced across Australia as part of the chain's commitment to using less plastic.

These signs are proving to be too much for some Macca's fans. Picture: Facebook
These signs are proving to be too much for some Macca's fans. Picture: Facebook

The big change has also left customers confused.

While some think it's ridiculous they have to ask for a "basic" item, others are scratching their heads over how exactly they'll be able to consume their favourite drinks - especially thickshakes.

"Forks will now be offered as alternative to using straw for drinking your large coke," one person scoffed on Facebook.

"No wonder I didn't get a straw earlier," another said.

Many speculated the same heavily criticised paper straws that have been introduced in the UK will soon be rolled out in Australia too as part of Macca's pledge to phase out plastic straws by 2020.

British McDonald's customers have been less than impressed by the restaurant's paper straw option. Picture: Twitter/LeanteDave
British McDonald's customers have been less than impressed by the restaurant's paper straw option. Picture: Twitter/LeanteDave

"Paper straws are OK but better paper quality not this one that is falling apart as soon as its touching liquid," one Aussie said.

"The paper ones are useless, either keep plastic or just use your mouth," another wrote.

"Paper straws go soggy, if they give me a paper straw I'll slap them silly," another said.

A spokeswoman from McDonald's Australia said the fast-food chain was working with different suppliers and partners to find other options for its customers.

"At Macca's, we're always looking for ways to reduce our environmental impact and in recent years, we have made numerous changes to our packaging," a spokesperson told news.com.au

They added they remained "committed" to phasing out the use of the plastic straws and had been working to find viable and sustainable alternatives "for some time".

"As part of this work, we have been conducting a number of trials in restaurants around the country - including paper straws and providing straws from behind the counter."

When Macca's first revealed its no-straw plans to Aussies in July last year, it caused outrage.

The signs are being trialled across Australia as the company attempts to find a solution to its plastic free promise. Picture: istock
The signs are being trialled across Australia as the company attempts to find a solution to its plastic free promise. Picture: istock

One Facebook user said it was "overkill looking for public praise".

"What about the lid on the drinks that uses so much more plastic," he said.

"Then we have plastic spoons and knives and forks they give you. This campaign is bordering on insane."

In the UK, some customers have been so incensed by the introduction of the paper straws, a petition was launched to "bring back" the plastic ones.

 

 

 

 

It began when an angry customer Martin Reed posted a photo to Twitter of his thickshake with an unusable straw flopping over the edge.

He said he just wanted to "drink my milkshake proper".

Others also complained, claiming it changed the flavour of their beverage and that drinking was now "impossible".

The petition in the UK has already reached 51,071 of the 75,000 signatures it's seeking.

Meanwhile here in Australia, a campaign from a Cairns schoolgirl called Straw No More helped Macca's agree to ditch plastic altogether in its 990 stores.

 

Continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | rebekah.scanlan@news.com.au