Flash Dance: Join four other team members Michael Borenstein, Alex Benham, Dale Emerson, Shel Kronich, John Allen, Ken Golding, Mike Russo, Barry and Kimberley McIntyre.
Flash Dance: Join four other team members Michael Borenstein, Alex Benham, Dale Emerson, Shel Kronich, John Allen, Ken Golding, Mike Russo, Barry and Kimberley McIntyre. Amber Gibson

Have you seen the flash mob of Old Men Dancing?

As simply as their title suggests, Old Men Dancing is a dance group of eight men over 65 who dance, for flexibility, connection and fun.

Last Saturday, for the first time, they performed as a flashmob in a full house of people as part of Hot Shorts Festival at the Drill Hall Theatre in Mullumbimby.

Alex Benham who has been involved in the group since it began in April said any movement that allows him to improve his flexibility is a good thing.

"It's a matter of use it or loose it,” Mr Benham said.

"It's an interesting way to bond with other men, quite different to golf.”

Mr Benham is involved with the Drill Hall Theatre Company but this is the first time he has explored dance.

"Initially I thought, 'Dancing?'. I don't know if that's me but it's a nice thing to do.

"Sometimes you float around in your own little world but other times you need to coordinate with people.”

Dancer and choreographer Kimberley McIntyre said she had the idea to work with older men a year ago and since April has been running a weekly dance class for the men to meet each week.

Ms McIntyre said "they were right on the money” during last weeks performance and that the audience responded with openness and intrigued to the unique Northern Rivers troupe.

"People always talk about how when you get older you become invisible,” Ms McIntyre said.

"It was about being seen and being comfortable being seen.

"It was really lovely.”

Shel Kronich who joined the group with the incentive to be "less heavy footed” said he has progressed to "twinkle toes” feeling more graceful and light on his feet now.

"When we did the performance, one thing I hoped came across was that its ok for men to be gentle and interact and be men and then still be able to dance and carry on.”

Towards the end of the performance the men reach out to pick up one of their members from the ground, Mr Kronich said the move was "symbolic of the fact that as men we can be gentle and be strong and help each other”.

"Hopefully, we can give that to the world.”

Dale Emerson said he first began learning the importance of dance after a car crash in 2011 when he began moving his body as therapy.

When he found out about the group a few months ago he thought it was a great idea, as "older guys getting together to connect and move your body”, so he joined.

"Previous to my car accident and my need to get back into my body, I would of said 'I would of chosen golf or tennis',” Mr Emerson said.

"As men we need to be more connected with our bodies and how we synchronise with other people so we can be more empathetic, compassionate.”

At the performance, he said the biggest challenge was to "get up and confront themselves with a crowd of people”.

"In the final performance, people started to laugh and then they went silent and really got into it, because they allowed themselves to get into this flashmob event of these old guys moving and getting out of our comfort zone.

"It's fantastic.

"They didn't laugh all the way through, that is a 100% win.”

The dance was performance to Boogie Street by Leonard Cohen.