SCU student Sabrina Singh will feature in a booklet documenting the difference universities make to regional communities.
SCU student Sabrina Singh will feature in a booklet documenting the difference universities make to regional communities. Elise Derwin

How abused kids' plight turned student to social work

TEACHERS regularly inspire their students.

But for Sabrina Singh it was school students who inspired her to want to help.

Midway through a teaching degree at Southern Cross University, Ms Singh was on a placement at a local school when she discovered some of her students lived in violent or abusive homes.

"I started a teaching degree at Southern Cross and completed a year and a half of that degree, which included two student placements. During my second teaching placement, I became aware of the home circumstances of some students,” she said.

"This was because it affected their behaviour at school. It meant we were looking for certain developmental milestones and actively modelling positive behaviours.”

Ms Singh, a descendent of a local pioneering family, is now studying a masters of social work at SCU to help tackle the cause of family violence.

"Once I completed my two social welfare placements and was more involved in the field, my family saw it was something I was passionate about and could emotionally manage. My parents were actually very supportive of me going down whatever field I wanted to. So, I am lucky!”

Ms Singh is one of a dozen regional university graduates and students from across the country featured in the Regional Universities Network's Student Success Story booklet.

While studying her masters degree, Ms Singh works for Anglicare North Coast on a program supporting women from refugee and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. -NewsRegional

If you need help in relation to family violence:

1800 Respect national helpline 1800737732

Women's Crisis Line 1800811811

Lifeline (24 hour crisis line) 131114