Bill Larrescy's extensive collection of memorabilia went to auction on Saturday with over 190 registered bidders.
Bill Larrescy's extensive collection of memorabilia went to auction on Saturday with over 190 registered bidders. Amber Gibson

Huge demand for 4000 treasures at man cave auction

MORE than 300 bidders filled Lismore Showground on Saturday to make an offer on Bill Larrescy's 4000-piece, no-reserve antique and collectable sale.

Auctioneer Graham Lancaster said he was initially blown away by the quality and diversity of Mr Larrescy's possessions but the auction "went way beyond expectation, with many record prices”.

A top performer, was an original baked enamel Coopers Blowfly advertisement sign made in the 1930s, expected to sell for $2000-$4000 but sold for $5500.

Mr Larrescy bought the sign for $1200.

His first and favourite piece, which he bought in Gatton, Queensland for $500 - a Peters ice-cream tin sign made in the 1950s - sold for $1150.

Some standout wild-card performers included antique cream cans which were predicted to sell for $100-$150 but were bought from $300-$500; a small American cash register sold for $3300 and a set of three traditional metal nickel ice-cream scoops from the 1950s which sold for $275.

Among the collection was a rare Toowoomba Foundry tractor seat, more than 50 years old, which sold for $2250 and a cow bell which sold for $3200.

Mr Lancaster said the in-demand cans may be indicative of the Lismore farming region and appreciation for the dairy industry.

Mr Larrescy's said he was "very happy” with the outcome. For the past 15 years, he has been travelling north to Rockhampton and down south to Goulburn searching for enamel signs, oil bottles and racks, tins, tractor seats, traps, cow bells and dairy memorabilia to add to his collection.

With three sheds full, he said it was time to sell.

"Once it's gone, it's gone,” he said.