HOT RESEARCH: A Southern Cross University honours student is calling for players of team sports on the Northern Rivers to swallow a pill at a supervised training session so their core temperatures can be recorded when playing on synthetic turf.
HOT RESEARCH: A Southern Cross University honours student is calling for players of team sports on the Northern Rivers to swallow a pill at a supervised training session so their core temperatures can be recorded when playing on synthetic turf.

Ingest a body heat pill, do some exercise for SCU researcher

A SOUTHERN Cross University honours student is calling for people who played team sports last year to volunteer for a research project which involves ingesting a body heat pill.

Gurpreet Singh graduated from his Bachelor Sports and Exercise science last year.

He said once the Ingestible Thermal Monitoring System pill is inside the gastrointestinal tract, the quartz crystal sensor vibrates at a frequency relative to the body's temperature, producing magnetic flux and transmitting a harmless, low-frequency signal through the body.

This signal can then be retrieved by a recorder, outside of the body, that displays the core body temperature reading with an accuracy to within one-tenth of a degree, Celsius.

"We need a minimum of 24 people and a maximum of 30 people to participate in the research," he said.

"The research is investigating the effects of exercising/training on synthetic grass compared to natural turf in the heat.

"It will involve a conditioning session conducted by accredited exercise scientists and all participants will receive an individualised report on their body fat/muscle percentages, body temperature, heart rate and sweat loss.

"It would make for a perfect pre-season training for any team, delivered by exercise/sports scientists."

Mr Singh said participants will need to aged between 18-40 years of age at the session, which will be held at the Liverpool Football Academy fields in Lismore, on February 29.

"Participants must have played a team sport such as soccer, rugby, hockey, Aussie Rules, softball, baseball or tennis are ideal," he said.

"Anecdotally, synthetic fields are hotter to play on and Australia is such a hot country."

Mr Singh, a keen cricketer, said the pill was safe and easily flushed out of the body's system.

More information via g.singh.70@student.scu.edu.au