No McHappy ending for fast food police impersonator

A NSW Corrective Services officer who impersonated a police officer to get a discount on a McDonalds feed will likely lose his job.

Maroubra man Lawrence O'Driscoll-Faitaua, 43, appeared in Waverley Local Court on Tuesday and pleaded guilty after he asked for a police discount on the meal at the Kingsford McDonalds outlet last month.

The father, who was employed at Long Bay Correctional Centre, showed an ID card before ordering the meal on December 29.

Corrective Services  officer Lawrence O'Driscoll-Faitaua dashes from Waverly Court today.
Corrective Services officer Lawrence O'Driscoll-Faitaua dashes from Waverly Court today.

But a McDonalds manager became suspicious and later reported the incident to police, who identified O'Driscoll-Faitaua on CCTV.

When he was confronted at work days later he said he was "told by other correctional officers that it was common practice" and "expressed remorse".

In court, his defence lawyer Dominic Longhurst conceded it was likely his client would lose his job with Corrective Services.

"He's most ashamed for not being a better role model for his young son," Mr Longhurst said.

"As a consequence of his actions and these charges it is most likely my client's employment with Corrective Services will be terminated and, in addition, it is unlikely he will be able to gain employment with the public service ever again."

 

Lawrence O'Driscoll-Faitaua leaves Waverly Court with his lawyer after being charged with impersonating a police officer to get a discount at a fast food restaurant.
Lawrence O'Driscoll-Faitaua leaves Waverly Court with his lawyer after being charged with impersonating a police officer to get a discount at a fast food restaurant.

In sentencing, Magistrate Jacqueline Trad criticised O'Driscoll-Faitaua for his "foolish" decision which put his career on the line for a discount of only around $10.

"You've got to understand it's a fine line that people step when they start flashing these things for different purposes and then the next thing and the next thing and it becomes more serious," she said.

"(It's a) very, very foolish action that finds you in this situation … you told officers that it was something you've been told about by work colleagues. The issue is of course you stand alone and (have to) face the consequences of your actions."

O'Driscoll-Faitaua was convicted on a charge of impersonating a police officer but escaped conviction on a charge of obtaining financial advantage by deception due to the small amount of money.