CRUCIAL:  The Australian Education Union is ramping up its campaign to see the Turnbull Government ousted over its failure to commit fully to Gonski.
CRUCIAL: The Australian Education Union is ramping up its campaign to see the Turnbull Government ousted over its failure to commit fully to Gonski. Hamish Broome

Kevin Hogan facing united assault on missing Gonski pledge

A TEACHERS' campaign targeting the Federal Coalition's lack of committment to the Gonski school funding reforms is ramping up, with a protest today outside Page MP Kevin Hogan's office over the issue.

While Labor has promised to fund the "full Gonski" over the next three years, the Coalition has pledged $3.3 billion less with no indication of how it will be spent.

The difference translates to $27 million in the seat of Page.

AEU Federal President Correna Haythorpe said Malcolm Turnbull's rhetoric on "innovation" wasn't matched by his government's committment to schools - the foundation of any national transformation.

She said Gonski funding was a long-term investment in Australian society.

"We know that 1-in-7 15-year-olds struggles to read properly, and 1-in-5 struggles with basic maths," Ms Haythorpe said.

"It is not in our long-term social or economic interest to let these children leave school without the skills to get a job or lead a successful life."

The campaign appears to hitting home, with a ReachTel survey of 1500 voters in Page last month finding 59.4% of people believe Gonski should have been fully funded in the May budget and 33.2% less likely to vote for the Coalition because it wasn't.

Ms Haythorpe said Gonski's needs-based funding model was already a proven success.

"Schools all over NSW are using their increased resources to benefit students through greater one-to-one support, targeted literacy and numeracy programs and smaller classes," she said.

"That's a great start, but two-thirds of the extra Gonski funding is to be delivered in 2018 and 2019 - the years of Gonski that Malcolm Turnbull wants to stop.

Mr Hogan has defended the government, saying it had locked in a $7 billion dollar increase in total school spending between 2013 to 2020, from about $13 to $20 billion, or 54%.

"In the last year that he Federal Labor government was in power in 2012-13, the Federal Government was spending $12.9 billion on schools," he said.

"We have increased that this year to $16 billion. And over the next four, we aim to be spending $20.1 billion on education by 2020."

"We're not cutting money - we're increasing spending on education every year."

"The other side may well say they are going to increase it even more," he conceded.