PROUD HERITAGE: Uncle Ken Morgan and Uncle Reg King lay branches into the fire during the smoking ceremony to welcome guests to the official launch of Social Futures Reconciliation Acton Plan yesterday.
PROUD HERITAGE: Uncle Ken Morgan and Uncle Reg King lay branches into the fire during the smoking ceremony to welcome guests to the official launch of Social Futures Reconciliation Acton Plan yesterday. Natsky aka Natalie Barovsky

New action plan is a step towards unity, social justice

NATIONAL Reconciliation Week is a chance to bridge divides between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and this week another step towards unity in Lismore.

Social Futures officially launched its Reconciliation Action Plan at Lismore City Hall, outlining the organisation's plans to address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage in the region.

Among the guests at the launch was Lismore local Uncle Reg King, who explained what Reconciliation Week meant to him.

"It means working together, on both sides of the fence," he said.

"There should also be more unity between my people, and these kind of events help that."

 

He agreed with the 2018 Reconciliation Week theme: Don't Keep History a Mystery.

"The more we can get it out to the public and particular government areas, the more they can get a better understanding of the people who are trying to make amends and to make reconciliation happen, the better," Mr King said.

Social Futures chief executive Tony Davies said the plan was a commitment to achieving social justice for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

"A big part of our plan is looking at how we build our Aboriginal workforce and businesses," Mr Davies said.

"So we plan to buy more of our goods from Aboriginal businesses."

Mr Davies also said the community "should be listening to the original owners of the land" on the issue surrounding the date of Australia Day.

"Let's be honest, Australia was not formed on that day... Australia has a history of 60,000 or more years of strong, connected civilisation and it's important that the history is fully recognised," he said.

"Governments at every level should listen to what the elders, as the continuing custodians of this land say is the appropriate day."

National Reconciliation Week will run until Sunday, June 3.

Other Reconciliation Week events:

  • [Mis Conceive]: A powerful dance theatre work by Bundjalung, Wiradjuri and Ni-Vanuatu man Thomas E.S Kelly. At Lismore City Hall, 1 Bounty St, Lismore on Friday, June 29, 7.30pm and Saturday, June 30, 2pm and 7.30pm.
  • Human Library Event: The inspiring Aunty Thelma will be at the Lismore Library this Friday, June 1 from 11am. Don't miss this opportunity to hear her speak about the Stolen Generation and Reconciliation. Everyone is welcome.