I’m afraid a Shorten government will look like a self-serving union collective. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas
I’m afraid a Shorten government will look like a self-serving union collective. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

What we can expect with union lapdog as PM

IT looks for all the world like CFMMEU lapdog Bill Shorten is going to be Australia's next Prime Minister.

I hope I'm wrong but it seems that despite his best efforts Scott Morrison is running out of time.

And the Coalition trails Labor 46-54 on a two-party preferred basis.

So what can we expect? Labor could win an extra 19 seats on these figures. Does it deserve to win? An emphatic "No".

Wentworth blunted ScoMo's momentum. Thank you Malcolm Turnbull. Thank you Tony Abbott.

I’m afraid a Shorten government will look like a self-serving union collective. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas
I’m afraid a Shorten government will look like a self-serving union collective. Picture: AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

ScoMo should have been celebrating with unemployment figures for September the lowest level for seven years, thanks to jobs growth in NSW and Victoria, but not in Queensland.

Now it is time for the media to turn the spotlight on Slippery Shorten. I hope so.

The Opposition leader has been adept at avoiding questions on everything from Labor's stance on coal and climate change to union power, border protection and welfare handouts.

As far as I can see the ALP promises a raft of higher taxes on personal incomes, company profits, retirement savings and housing investments.

Labor-proposed changes to negative gearing and the capital gains tax will smash the construction industry and send independent self-managed retiree onto welfare.

Labor seeks to harm the very workers it says it will protect.

And electricity bills will go up, not down under Labor. This will further imperil small business.

I'm afraid a Shorten government will look like a self-serving union collective.

When is the media going to start asking him some tough questions?

The ACTU's ridiculous "Change the Rules!" campaign is aimed at convincing the Labor Party to making sweeping changes to the Fair Work Act will give unions a lot more power and impose major restrictions on businesses.

Labor is rewriting its handbook to redefine profit as a dirty word.

The Australian Industry Group has pointed out that much of the information the ACTU is distributing as part of its campaign is misleading and inaccurate.

Labor is toying with a retrograde change whereby unions would be allowed to go off the job in support of an industry-wide log of claims. This would be at odds with the spirit of enterprise bargaining all the way back to Paul Keating's 1993 reform.

Less than 10 per cent of Australians belong to unions. But they still wield inordinate power in the ALP.