Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton.
Minister for Home Affairs Peter Dutton. Patrick Woods

OPINION: Immigration gap widens

IT WOULD appear most of Australia's lefties are crying into their orange-frappe mochaccinos, and those on right are beating their chest in victory.

So, what does that mean people like me are doing?

I am shaking my head in disbelief that people in Australia are stupid enough to think all the government's policies are good, while others were too naive to think everything was going to change.

I might be in the minority because I think the political world is divided so deeply down the left and right no one is brave enough to cross to the other side.

The immigration debate is possibly where the widest gap exists, and getting people on the right to admit Australia's policies are cruel is like asking them to swim across the ditch to New Zealand.

I have written about immigration policy previously, but for those who need revision it is simple enough.

Australia should offer those seeking protection the help they need, while keeping out people who are a danger to our society.

There you have it - my foolproof immigration plan.

However, it has been made harder than it is by decades of fear stirred up by politicians out to gain points over their opposition, and also a lack of proper funding.

And it shouldn't be like that because Australia has the heart to welcome people from across the globe. You might say what we have is fine, it all works okay so there's no need to change a thing.

Well, I hate to tell that it is not that good, and the fact Peter Dutton's crew would not let a two-year-old have a birthday cake (I can't let that go), and that scores of people attempt suicide while in detention proves my point.

Australia's resources are vast, and if the government was brave enough to tax a few big companies there would be more money at its disposal to implement policies that would speed up the immigration process while being more humane to the people in the system.

Additionally, there would be money to spend on other social projects as well, meaning more people than just those seeking asylum would benefit.

There must be a point whether you are left, right or in between when you admit the way it is being done is wrong.

If we did it right, there would be cause for us to celebrate.

Monday: Betty Lowis