TRENDING STYLE: Margie Perkins creating a modern metro medallion quilt with curved piecing .
TRENDING STYLE: Margie Perkins creating a modern metro medallion quilt with curved piecing . Amber Gibson

Quilters' innovate with unconventional, modern designs

AT THIS years Airing Of the Quilts, modern designers stole the show, praised for their innovation, bold fabrics and techniques that broke traditional quilting rules.

Carol Bonamy, coordinator of the three-day exhibition held over the weekend, said there has been a resurgence of quilting since the 1980s.

However, in the past 10 years, a modern quilt-making renaissance has emerged, characterised by minimal designs that move away from conventional techniques and take advantage of modern technology.

"Every quilt tells a story," Ms Bonamy said.

 

Quilt maker Margie Perkins said she loves the modern aspects that allow quilts to complement home decor.

"I think it appeals to the younger people that like simple but beautiful piecing," Ms Perkins said.

"I also use them for wall pieces as my art."

Traditional quilting is known for busy or pictorial patterns, using recycled materials and a structured number of stitches per inch.

But modern quilters explore big stitch lengths, computer-generated design and new fabrics.

The theme of this year's exhibition was 2477.

This challenged 15 quilters to design a miniature quilt inspired by Alstonville's postcode.

The designs on these quilts showcased community members in the region, maps of Alstonville, local houses and landscapes.

This was the 12th Airing of the Quilts event held at Crawford House in Alstonville as a fundraiser for the Crawford House Museum and 148 quilts were displayed and more than 350 people attended.

Ms Bonamy said the event "is about bringing old and new quilts to showcase".