Clear skies are forecast.
Clear skies are forecast.

Rejoice! There's now more time to enjoy your day

THERE'S now more time in your day, with spring equinox bringing more daylight than darkness for the next six months.

The spring equinox marks the moment our sun appears to pass over Earth's equator after spending the last six months positioned above the northern hemisphere.

The Bureau of Meteorology says the date and time at which the centre of the sun is directly over the equator in late September is called the equinox-from the Latin for 'equal night'.

 

Spring equinox: Today marks the time days will be longer than nights for the next six months. The date and time at which the centre of the Sun is directly over the equator in late September is called the equinox--from the Latin for 'equal night'.
Spring equinox: Today marks the time days will be longer than nights for the next six months. The date and time at which the centre of the Sun is directly over the equator in late September is called the equinox--from the Latin for 'equal night'. Bureau of Meteorology

"In the southern hemisphere, this marks the tipping point from days being shorter than nights, to days becoming longer than nights.

"The technical spring equinox and most of Australia sees about 12 h 8 min. of daylight on the spring equinox itself.

"This is because our atmosphere refracts (bends) sunlight so that we can see the Sun just before it's risen in line with the horizon and just after it's passed below the level of the horizon at sunset."

 

Diagram: Earth has seasons because its axis is tilted. Earth rotates on its axis as it orbits the Sun, but the axis always points in the same direction.
Diagram: Earth has seasons because its axis is tilted. Earth rotates on its axis as it orbits the Sun, but the axis always points in the same direction. Bureau of Meteorology

Earth's rotation gives us days and nights and our tilt relative to the sun throughout the year produces our seasons.

Following our spring equinox, days will stay longer than nights in the southern hemisphere until late March next year.

If this has perhaps gone over your head, take a break and go outside to enjoy the longest day since March.

Forecast

The region is still waiting for a good dose of rainfall after a tease of light droplets over the weekend in some parts.

Temperatures range from low to mid 20s for coastal areas including Byron Bay and Ballina this week, while inland areas such as Lismore will be a few degrees warmer, with temperatures tipping 30C over the weekend.

There is a high chance of showers for parts of the region on Thursday, with 4-5mm of rain forecast.

But unfortunately, we could still be waiting a while longer for a good drenching with Weather Zone's 28 day forecast predicting only 13 days with a low chance of any rain.

"Over southern and eastern Australia the cold front events with potential to bring widespread rain are now expected about 27 September to 1 October, 13 October to 17 October, and 24 October to 28 October," Northern Rivers 28-day Rainfall Forecast reads.

"Rain events originating in the tropics and moving south are possible about 12 October to 16 October."