Report shows an unacceptably high amount of drownings in Australia
Report shows an unacceptably high amount of drownings in Australia Scott Powick

Report shows rise in drowning in Australia last year

THE Royal Life Saving National Drowning Report 2016 has found 280 people drowned in Australian waterways in the 2015/16 financial year, an increase of 5% per cent increase on the previous 12 months, with males drowning at a far higher rate than females.

There were 96 drownings in New South Wales in 2015/16, which is a decrease of 6% on the 10-year average.

The most deaths occurred in people aged 25 to 34 (18%), with males accounting for 91% of incidents overall.

Almost of third of drownings occurred at beaches (31%), with 27% of people swimming and recreating prior to drowning.

The report shows males accounted for 83% of drownings deaths in 2015/16, This is the highest percentage of male drownings in 10 years.

Almost one fifth of deaths (19%) occurred in people aged 25 to 34, with 52 deaths recorded.

This year, beaches were the leading location for drowning, accounting for 23% of deaths, followed by rivers and creeks (21%) and ocean / harbour locations (19%).

Royal Life Saving notes the decrease in the number of people drowning at rivers, creeks, lakes and dams is encouraging.

Inland waterways continue to be a leading location for drowning, with more than a quarter of all drownings occurring at rivers, creeks, lakes and dams.

There were 75 deaths at inland waterways this year: 58 at rivers and creeks, and 17 at lakes and dams.

There was a 25% decrease in drowning at rivers, with the 58 a reduction on the 10-year average of 77.

There was a 30% decrease in the number of children aged 0-4 who drowned this year compared to the 10 year average of 21.