Heartfelt act with a single poppy left for soldier

LEST WE FORGET: In the lead-up to Anzac Day, a lone poppy has been placed on the new Ballina Cenotaph.
LEST WE FORGET: In the lead-up to Anzac Day, a lone poppy has been placed on the new Ballina Cenotaph. Graham Broadhead

IT'S a simple gesture.

No-one is sure who did it, and possibly the person that laid a single knitted poppy at the Ballina Cenotaph isn't concerned about that.

The important thing is that it shows Clement John Gribble hasn't been forgotten.

Peter Cucilovic, from the Ballina RSL Sub-Branch, spotted the poppy last Tuesday.

It was still there last Wednesday, and Mr Cucilovic hopes that it is left alone.

With the poppy is a card which outlines the life of Clement Gribble, with a photograph.

Clement Gribble was born in Murrurundi on February 7 in either 1893 or 1894, the son of chaplain Captain Arthur Hazlehurst Gribble AIF.

With the serial number 938, Clement served with the 30th Battalion during the First World War, and was killed in action on March 22, 1917.

Clement is just one of thousands of Australians who lost their lives during that war.

This year's Anzac Day will commemorate the centenary of the Anzac landing at Gallipoli on April 25, 1915.

As a tribute to the relatives of local people who served in the First World War, and gave the ultimate sacrifice in that conflict, we invite you to send The Northern Star a "selfie" of you holding a picture of your relative (in uniform). Include your relative's name and the unit they served with, if you know it.

Email the photos to news@northernstar.com.au.