Jaydn Maree Pollard, 47, a law student, crashed her motorbike while more than four times the limit, while riding unlicensed and with drugs in her blood.
Jaydn Maree Pollard, 47, a law student, crashed her motorbike while more than four times the limit, while riding unlicensed and with drugs in her blood.

Sloshed, unlicensed, dope smoking student dodges conviction

A WANNABE lawyer who crashed her motorbike, while unlicensed, after a night on the turps and later tested positive for drugs, has walked from court without a conviction.

Jaydn Maree Pollard, 47, a mature age law student at Charles Darwin University, on Wednesday pleaded guilty to driving unlicensed, high range drink driving and driving with a cannabis in her system.

Pollard appeared self-represented in a neck brace, having crashed her 125cc Bolwell Orbit scooter at 4.15am on June 9.

The court heard she hit the kerb on the Stuart Hwy and crashed, with a passer-by calling emergency services.

At Royal Darwin Hospital, a blood test returned a blood-alcohol reading of 0.22, more than four times the legal limit for driving.

It also returned a positive for THC, the active ingredient in cannabis. Pollard's C-Class drivers licence did not allow her to ride the scooter.

Pollard said: "I do realise that I put the community at risk that morning."

"I don't normally drink and I don't normally attend pubs and clubs."

Pollard said she worked the day before the crash, and went drinking in the city.

She said the positive reading for cannabis would have been from smoking on a previous day.

Pollard said she was two years into her law degree at CDU and was an executive member of the student council.

"I have suffered from this accident," she said.

"I would hate to think I had put anyone's life at risk."

She asked for a non-conviction "due to my ongoing legal studies and employment".

Judge Elizabeth Morris said if Pollard crashed her "tiny" scooter it would be unlikely to hurt anyone else.

"Your mistake … has had what will be a lifelong impact," she said.

She said a conviction could have an impact on Pollard's professional goals.

"I don't think you're going to be coming back to this court in any capacity as a defendant."

Without conviction, Pollard was fined $400, and ordered to pay victim impact levies.

She was also disqualified from driving for a year.