Hanson told 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes her biggest fear was if Latham was to desert her. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co
Hanson told 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes her biggest fear was if Latham was to desert her. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co

Big issue Hanson and Latham disagree on

AS s two outspoken conservative politicians, Pauline Hanson and Mark Latham might seem like a steadfast union.

But it appears just a few months after the One Nation leader announced Latham would join her party as the candidate for the NSW upper house, cracks could already be showing.

And on an issue that forms a key part of Hanson's policy platform, too.

Latham described tonight’s interview as a “commitment ceremony”. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co
Latham described tonight’s interview as a “commitment ceremony”. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co

In an interview with 60 Minutes tonight, the pair discussed their admiration of each other's political endeavours, their history in parliament, and plans for One Nation.

One topic of noticeable absence, however, was when Ms Hanson was left sitting next to an empty chair during a Studio 10 interview, soon after they announced Latham's political comeback.

Latham had pulled out of the interview, leaving her to fly solo,

Taking a cue from Married At First Sight, the former Labor Leader described the interview as their "commitment ceremony", and hit back at claims their coupling would not last.

"Well, you know, what I find curious is the focus on us. I suppose there is because we're outspoken, we try to speak the truth, and we say things that the lefties in particular don't like, and we cop all the outrage," Latham said.

Hanson was quick to write off such talk as people simply seeing them as a threat, after earlier agreeing that in some ways, Latham was a male version of her.

"That's what it is. They see us as a threat and it's all wishful thinking that they want to see us not work together and it'll sort of finish."

It was revealed they have differing opinions over banning the burqa. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co
It was revealed they have differing opinions over banning the burqa. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co

Hanson mused that she'd always that she'd always "imagined Mark to be a future Prime Minister", and had no apprehension about his demanor.

Latham was quizzed about his past violent behaviour, including when he broke a taxi driver's arm in 2001.

When asked if she was comfortable knowing this, Hanson replied: "Yes, I am, actually. I really am."

But when it came to the issue of banning the burqa, an issue Hanson has championed, it was revealed the two had differing opinions.

"He doesn't agree with banning it completely in communities or on streets and that type of thing, but we have talked about it and compromised," Hanson said.

And she admitted Latham wasn't in agreeance with the idea in the beginning, adding "he had concerns about it".

But Latham explained the issue surrounded the implementation of such a ban.

"If they wear it in their own mosque, if they wanna wear it in their own home, Mark didn't believe that was a real problem. I, you know, think that to wear the full burqa, the full covering, especially getting your driver's licence or driving a car is not feasible. It's unworkable. Where it does impact on society is in banks, in government buildings, in schools, in hospitals and these type of things," Hanson said.

Hanson told 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes her biggest fear was if Latham was to desert her. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co
Hanson told 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes her biggest fear was if Latham was to desert her. Picture: 60 Minutes/Nine Entertainment Co

Hanson said she was looking forward to Latham's ability to articular policy positions, but admitted to 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes her fear was if Latham was to desert her.

Former NSW federal Senator Brian Burston quit the party last year, and former federal QLD Senator Fraser Anning resigned immediately after taking his seat in 2017.

"No, well, that's not going to happen. I'm committed to what we're standing for, what we're fighting for. I love the state where I've always lived and I would respect the people in saying, if you voted for me as One Nation, I'll be there advocating One Nation policies until I drop," Latham said.