Mirani MP Stephen Andrew tabled a petition to parliament calling for a review into 1080 baits after a spate of domestic and working dog deaths. Photo: Daryl Wright
Mirani MP Stephen Andrew tabled a petition to parliament calling for a review into 1080 baits after a spate of domestic and working dog deaths. Photo: Daryl Wright

The poison 'epidemic' taking out loved ones

PEST controller and politician Stephen Andrew has taken a stand against a common agricultural bait, calling the poison's spread a "Queensland epidemic".

Last week, the Mirani MP tabled a petition to parliament calling for a review into 1080 baits after a spate of domestic and working dog deaths.

The petition, started by Sarina resident Alan Kochevatkin after the death of his mastiff great dane, received more than 450 signatures calling for the review of 1080 exclusions zones and training.

In areas where rural farms are bumping into domestic blocks and residential areas, the effects have been devastating, Mr Andrew said.

"We've had an increased number of collateral damage deaths," Mr Andrew said.

He said some of his constituents had come to him in tears, after watching their dogs die in their arms after consuming 1080 bait.

Syd Miels, from Plane Creek, after his weimararer dog Kula died after eating 1080 baits.
Syd Miels, from Plane Creek, after his weimararer dog Kula died after eating 1080 baits.

"Those dogs were like family to them," he said.

Mr Andrew said the poison should be treated more seriously by legislators.

"1080 is a deadly poison with no antidote," he said "the mortality rate is 100 per cent".

"If you ingest it, you call everyone you love and tell them. Then pick your favourite bottle of whiskey and hope for the best".

"(But) you're not coming back".

Mr Andrew said a lack of training and oversight of the poison - as well as some lazy behaviour from some landholders - had caused the unnecessary suffering.

The pest controller recommended landholders monitor, and ideally film, the proposed baiting site before laying out the poison.

"If you see old mate's dog is coming in (to the baited area), warn them," he said.

"Don't go out there and strike a foul blow with your neighbours."

Mr Andrew said he expected a "common sense" review of the poisons would receive wide support across the political divide.

Agriculture Minister Mark Furner and Mackay MP Julieanne Gilbert did not respond to requests for comment.