COME ALONG FOR BEER AND WINGS: Wayne Taylor and Eliot Krause meet at Taps in Mooloolaba every Wednesday to chat about life and its vicissitudes.
COME ALONG FOR BEER AND WINGS: Wayne Taylor and Eliot Krause meet at Taps in Mooloolaba every Wednesday to chat about life and its vicissitudes. John McCutcheon

Two average Joes determined to change mental health stigma

THEY aren't doctors, or psychiatrists or counsellors, just two born and bred Sunshine Coast locals who care about mental health.

GET A PAIR OF SENNHEISER HEADPHONES WITH YOUR DAILY SUBSCRIPTION

Good mates Wayne Taylor and Eliot Krause have both been touched by suicide and are determined to make a difference.

For the past six months the plumber and real estate agent have met every Wednesday afternoon for "beers, wings and a laugh" at Taps Mooloolaba.

They talk about their own lives, work, partners, general chat about how they're going.

They find they come away feeling better about themselves. Their partners have noticed it too.

"We have always found it good to have this kind of relationship," Mr Taylor said.

"But how many men out there must not have something like this available. So they battle behind closed doors."

Now they've put the call out for men to join them on the first Wednesday of every month.

It's struck a chord with locals.

COME ALONG FOR BEER AND WINGS: Wayne Taylor and Eliot Krause meet at Taps in Mooloolaba every Wednesday to chat about life and its vicissitudes.
COME ALONG FOR BEER AND WINGS: Wayne Taylor and Eliot Krause meet at Taps in Mooloolaba every Wednesday to chat about life and its vicissitudes. John McCutcheon

 

Do you want to see more about men's mental health on the Sunshine Coast?

This poll ended on 04 August 2018.

Current Results

Yes, it's so important

84%

No, people should keep to themselves.

7%

If it encourages people to be more open.

7%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Since posting the idea to Facebook, it has gained hundreds of comments, likes and shares.

"We don't claim to have all the answers or anything, by no stretch of the imagination," Mr Krause said.

"We just come away feeling good about ourselves. So if a stranger can join us, they might leave here with their mind changed too.

"The Coast is a great place but we have to look after one another.

"Taps is a totally neutral playing field and just a good place to get the juices flowing."

Both men say they're fortunate enough to not struggle with the black dog but it has affected them.

"I lost a mate 10 years ago, he threw himself in front of a train," Mr Taylor said.

"One day he decided it was best for him to leave this Earth. It was his short-term solution to a long-term problem unfortunately.

"And it is a bit of a trend in my family," Mr Krause added.

"No one needs to be alone and battle the black dog, come and eat and have a chat, no judgment here just a good catchup amongst other gents.

"Depression takes too many good men way too soon."

The pair will next meet again on September 5 at 12pm.