The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains.
The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains. The Knitting Nannas

Why these women sprinkled coal dust on their porridge

A GROUP of women sat down to a breakfast of porridge yesterday, with a liberal sprinkling of coal dust.

It's not the latest hipster food trend, but rather a Knitting Nannas protest against the granting of an exploration licence to dig for coal on the Liverpool Plains.

 

The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains.
The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains. The Knitting Nannas

As the Northern Rivers Nannas sat outside the Shenhua Watermark office in Gunnedah, a train of motorists heading to AgQuip 2018 tooted their horns and waved as they passed by.

Knitting Nanna spokeswoman Louise Somerville didn't recommend it, saying "it tastes yucky" - but that's the point.

They have joined farmers from the Plains who are fighting to stop some of the best food production agricultural land in Australia from becoming coal mines.

Knitting Nannas out coal on their porridge: The Knitting Nannas put coal dust on their porridge, to prove a point.
Knitting Nannas out coal on their porridge: The Knitting Nannas put coal dust on their porridge, to prove a point.

"Knitting Nannas from Lismore have raised $325 in notes and coins and are delivering the bucket of money to the Namoi CWA Group today," Nanna Louise said.

"We hope it helps a little to ease the sadness in the North West."

 

The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains.
The Knitting Nannas eat coal dust on their porridge to protest a coal mine on the Liverpool Plains. The Knitting Nannas

Nanna Felicity said she "found it hard to swallow that the NSW Government is protecting mining while our food growers suffer the worst drought in decades".

Farmers John Hanparsum, Andrew Pursehouse and David Quince said they "have had enough" of fighting the coal miners and want to get back to farming.