A  juvenile male King Parrot in WIRES bird co-ordinator Melanie Barsony's Casino garden has a refreshing drink during a heatwave.
A juvenile male King Parrot in WIRES bird co-ordinator Melanie Barsony's Casino garden has a refreshing drink during a heatwave. Melanie Basony

WIRES come to the rescue as birds feel the heat

AN INCREASE in the number of animals feeling the heat has the good Samaritans of the Wildlife Information Rescue, Education Service, rescuing dozens of our feathered friends over the past few days..

All over the Northern Rivers, WIRES volunteers have been dealing with birds suffering from heat stress.

WIRES birds co-ordinator, Melanie Basony, said she and many other volunteers have been kept busy over the past few days thanks to the extreme heat.

"In the two weeks since the beginning of February we have had 128 calls to rescue birds in trouble," she said.

"Mnd many of our volunteers have observed birds not normally seen together and I've seen butcher birds, lorikeets, figbirds and blue faced honey-eaters all in the one water dish sharing a drink"

Ms Basony said birds show heat stress by holding their wings out and visibly breathing with their beaks open.

She said it's important people do all they can to help their local wildlife get through the heat waves.

"On really hot day like the weekend when temperatures soar, hose the trees and bushes outside to ensure there is water falling through the leaves and cooling the area," she said.

"But you have make sure the hose run a while first as if it's been in the sun it will be very very hot."

She said if people are able to run a sprinkler, it could be a real lifesaver.

"Running a sprinkler is fantastic, particularity in shady place as the birds will soon figure out where this is and fly under it," she said.

"Having the sprinkler on will also cool the area around it and put out dishes of water, not only for birds, but also a shallow dish with a rock in it for lizards and other little animals such as frogs."

Ms Basony reminded people it's important to remember to change the water every day.

"Otherwise it gets faeces in it and then it gets manky," she said.

Birdlife's Northern Rivers coordinator Richard Jordan also urged people to keep birdbath's clean and filled.

Mr Jordan reminded people how birds are creatures of habit and if they are used to visiting a garden to use a birdbath or pond, the garden owners need to keep the supply of fresh clean water available.

To report an animal to WIRES you can use their 24 hour hotline 6628 1898.