VALUABLE PROJECT: Friends of Labyrinth, with the help from Kyogle Council have finished the base of the project, which is set to open within three months.
VALUABLE PROJECT: Friends of Labyrinth, with the help from Kyogle Council have finished the base of the project, which is set to open within three months. CONTRIBUTED

Work starts on Kyogle's 23m-wide labryinth

VISITORS and community members will soon be able to 'find themselves' at Kyogle's new labyrinth.

With the final intricate pattern designed by community group, Friends of the Labyrinth complete, stage one is under way and expected to be finished within three months.

The 23m wide base of the labyrinth was recently laid by volunteers and council in Alcorn Park near the tennis courts, an area historically known as the bull pen.

The project came about in 2016 when Harmony Walsh's labyrinth idea was voted the People's Choice at the Bright Ideas night in Kyogle.

Since then Friends of the Labyrinth have worked hard to bring the idea to fruition by fundraising thousands of dollars and securing a grant sponsored by Australian Post towards the $75,000 project. Kyogle Council also committed $20,000 in funds from the State Government to make it a reality.

Friends of the Labyrinth committee member Noelle Lynden-Way said the group was delighted with how the project was coming along.

"The concept behind the Labyrinth is to create harmony and balance for people,” Ms Lynden-Way said.

"You leave the outside world with the Labyrinth - you walk into the centre - as you are walking you have time for reflection on yourself and by the time you exit the labyrinth you are actually feeling much healthier about being in the outside world again.

"It's actually taking you into your interior. It will be exciting to see the finished result ... we are so grateful to council.”

Kyogle Council Mayor Danielle Mulholland said the labyrinth would the community would really benefit from the project.

"I'm excited for the community because this is a project that's been driven by the community and it's something they really want,” Cr Mulholland said.

"It will create a bit more tourism and it's a place where locals can go for some peace and quiet.”

Although several labyrinth designs were submitted to council, Cr Mulholland said some, which included tall bushes and trees, were knocked back due to safety concerns.

"Stage 2 will give the group the opportunity for the group to possibly add certain things the want, like a bench seat or meditation corner,” she said.

Kyogle Council's General Manager Graham Kennett said Friends of the Labyrinth maximised the community's involvement with the project by asking members to donate clean house bricks for the substrate.

"They also sold the pavers back to the community for them to prepare a design to be lazered onto the pavers and added throughout the labyrinth when its made,” Mr Kennett said.

"It's a great concept.

"The group have also designed the entry treatment using some old by bridge timber.

"Once stage 1 is complete, we will work with the community to develop a final plan for the surrounding areas.”