Kyogle's Lynda Clark yarn bombs Rappville sign and school.
Kyogle's Lynda Clark yarn bombs Rappville sign and school.

Yarn bombing brings colour to fire ravaged village

AT THE entrance to Rappville, red knitted roses have been looped around the metal legs of the village entrance sign.

Pink and white flowers made of wool have been placed on the Rappville School sign.

This yarn bombing of the village ravaged by fire on October 8, brings unexpected colour to the burnt landscape.

Kyogle's Lynda Clark took a friend and her brightest wool to bring colour and creativity to the community.

Yarn bombing is the practice of using knitted or crochet yarn to cover objects, usually objects in public view and is considered a creative form of activism.

For Ms Clark it is an art form she is passionate about and as she and a friend were putting up the knitted flowers, people waved from their cars.

"We don't do any damage,” she said.

Children especially like the yarn bombing, Ms Clark said.

"They see it for what it is and if they can reach it, they like to touch it.”

At the school principal Kat Collis and the groundsman helped put bright knitted pieces up high.

Ms Clark even took her cleaning equipment out there but someone had already cleaned the village sign before she got there.

Her small touch will remind Rappville of brighter things to come as the recovery and rebuild process continues.

Kyogle's Lynda Clark yarn bombs Rappville sign and school.
Kyogle's Lynda Clark yarn bombs Rappville sign and school.

DID YOU KNOW?

The concept of yarn bombing is thought to have originated in the United States in 2005 when Texan shop owner, Magda Sayeg, unhappy with the bland landscape around her, decided to knit a doorknob cosy for the shop. It attracted attention from passers-by, inspiring Sayeg to venture further with the idea of covering objects with yarn, ultimately leading her to establish the yarn bombing crew, Knitta Please.

Yarn bombing crews were founded across Europe, North America and Australasia.

In Warwick, in Queensland, they have the a Jumpers and Jazz Festival every July and the deciduous trees are covered with brightly coloured jumpers.